News

Researchers discover that the Omicron variant may have originated in mice

Findings suggest that researchers should focus on SARS-CoV-2 variants isolated from wild animals, especially rodents. If Omicron is determined to have been derived from mice, the implications of it circulating among non-human hosts will pose new challenges in the prevention and control of the epidemic

Women with older and overweight partners are at higher risk of embryo implantation failure

In a paper published in the KeAi journal Gynecology and Obstetrics Clinical Medicine, a group of researchers in China explored the effects of advanced paternal age (APA) and abnormal paternal weight (obesity) on in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment in nearly 800 couples who have experienced unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss (uRPL). Specifically, they considered the impact on embryo implantation, embryo quality and the health of the baby.

Researchers develop simple and scalable method of generating formate

Researchers used a one-step electrochemical anodic oxidation (AO) method to synthesise the nanoporous tin oxide using tin foil as the raw material. AO is a scalable, simple and efficient alternative for the preparation of nanoporous tin oxide, providing large specific surfaces, high porosity, and abundant grain boundaries. The researchers achieved a formate partial current density of 285 mA·cm-2 in a flow cell, with selectivity of 96.4%.

Why computational algorithms could transform COVID-19 diagnosis and care for low-income countries

In a study published in the KeAi journal Data Science and Management, a team of researchers from Africa and Canada tested the ability of seven computational algorithms to diagnose COVID-19 at an early stage, based on common symptoms. The researchers found that the algorithms Multilayer Perceptron, Fuzzy Cognitive Map and Deep Neural Network outperformed Logistic Regression, Naïve Bayes, Decision Tree and Support Vector Machine.

Scientists use sunlight and modified sawdust to reversibly capture carbon dioxide

In a study published in Green Energy & Environment, a group of researchers from Renmin University of China propose a new method to capture CO2 using sunlight as the energy source and modified sawdust as the CO2 absorbent. In addition to capturing CO2, their method also avoids using the fossil fuels that would create additional CO2. Importantly, the absorption method they have developed is reversible, so the captured CO2 can be used to generate other products, such as methanol, ethanol and methane.

‘Divide and conquer’ algorithm offers promising route for big data analysis

In this study, the researchers have focused on the large-scale inference of a linear expectile regression model, which has wide applications in risk management. They propose a communication-effective, divide and conquer algorithm, in which the summary statistics from the subsystems are combined by the confidence distribution.

New 3D, self-supported electrode could pave the way for large-scale hydrogen production

The numerous submicron channels on the surface of the honeycomb alloy, a large amount of nickel element migrates to the surface and transforms into another highly-active species, which greatly promotes oxygen production. As the method developed in this work can be readily scaled up, it may pave the way for fabricating more efficient, foam, metal-based materials for large-scale hydrogen production.

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